One Pot Winter Warmers: Miso Soup

28th July, 2015

Ahhhh, my most regularly eaten dish I reckon. Thank Goodness. A few images below of its different looks. Instead of the kombu (unavailable in Oz now) in this recipe – use 1 tbsp powdered dulse, nori or wakame. I use buckwheat noodles or rice noodles sometimes also. I also use organic soy, black bean or mung bean noodles when I have them. You’ll find these at your health food store. Use organic miso paste, as soy beans are mostly grown using GMO technology
Miso is great to help balance gut flora, blood sugar and helps to remove toxins from your body. My go-to recipe when I’m feeling b-nauseous, grose, tired, shabby, bloated – yucky fro any reason. It always grounds me, and sorts me right out.

miso 1

miso 2

miso 3

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‘One Pot Winter Warmers: ‘Vego’ Goulash’

28th July, 2015

goulash

This is a super easy and basic recipe. Go ahead and add other veggies like red + green capsicum, carrots, mushrooms, pumpkin, kale and/or sweet potato. Really its only the paprika that makes it Goulash and not a stew. Add in some soaked legumes for your protein – chick peas, borlotti, kidney, navy or adzuki beans – in with the veggies. if you like a creamy Goulash, you could stir through a cup of quark – a fermented dairy a bit like sour cream – just before serving (or indeed as a garnish). Make lots of Goulash, then scoop into containers enough for a single serve, then into the freezer for up to 3 months. You’ll be glad you did.

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One Pot Winter Warmers- ‘Adzuki Beans, Pumpkin and Ginger Casserole’.

28th July, 2015

This is a classic macrobiotic (Japanese diet) that will fill almost all of your nutritional needs. It’s a perfect winter dish as it uses dark foods (adze beans), shiitake mushrooms (anti vital and immune boosting), garlic and ginger. make lots as it freezes well. Kombu, the seaweed I’ve used in this recipe, is no longer available in Oz, so replace it with powdered dulse or nori, arame, or for the more seasoned seaweed eaters – wakame.

one pot

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‘One Pot Winter Warmers’-Fried rice

27th July, 2015

A trusty ol’ favourite of mine – Fried Rice, and regularly requested dish at my place.

fried rice

I use:
4 eggs
2 tsp mirin (optional)
½ tsp tamari
4 tbsp coconut oil
1 onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tbsp ginger, grated
1 tbsp fresh turmeric, grated
2 tbsp coriander stem, chopped
2 sticks celery, diced
2 corn cobs, kernels removed
1 cup peas or green beans finely sliced, or diced zucchini
1 cup firm smoked tofu, diced
1 tbsp tamari
1 tsp sesame oil
4 cups of cooked organic brown rice
4 dried shitaake mushrooms and 1 tbsp seaweed flakes
4 spring onions, sliced
1 long red chilli, chopped (optional)
1 cup coriander leaves, chopped

To make:
Whisk eggs with the mirin and seasoning. Pour batter into a pan with half the oil. Brown, flip, then roll up and slice. Set aside. Heat the rest of the oil in a wok or large skillet then add the onion, garlic, ginger, turmeric and coriander root and saute for a minute until fragrant. Now toss in all the veggies and sauté over a medium heat until almost soft, about 5 minutes. Next add the tofu, tamari and sesame oil and stir to coat. Sauté for another minute. Lastly add the rice, spring onions, chili, herbs and omelette and stir well to combine.

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Asian Broth with Fish, Veggies and Buckwheat Noodles

27th July, 2015

Here’s one of my go to meals – sometimes with tofu instead of the fish. I made this for dinner last night.

asian broth

In a large pot add some veggie stock and flavour it with chopped coriander stems, greater ginger and garlic, a few drops of sesame oil and fish sauce, and a splash of tamari. Simmer for a few minutes then add in your veggies at the same time as your noodles and fish. I used broccolini, carrots, mushrooms and zucchini and ‪#‎spiralfoods‬ buckwheat noodles and wild barramundi (cut into 3cm sq pieces). Simmer until all are just tender, then add a handful of sliced spring onions and coriander leaves to finish. Adjust seasoning. It was magnificent.

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A hearty breakfast

27th July, 2015

A hearty breakfast this morning, as I like it. Sautéed mushrooms, broccoli and red onion in olive oil, garlic and a little unrefined salt. On spelt and olive sourdough toast drizzled with a tiny bit of truffle oil. Heavenly. (I forgot my #madeinhemp seeds. D’oh)

breaky

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Seafood – Prawns

26th July, 2015

prawns 2

Prawns. Imported Vannamei and Tiger Prawns are grown in Asia using environmentally destructive techniques, and should be avoided at all costs. AMCS lists Wild and Australian Farmed Prawns as THINK TWICE, (including Crystal Bay). @AusMarConSoc lists ‘imported farmed prawns’ as SAY NO.

@AusMarConSoc recommends ‘haul caught school’ and ‘bay (Greentail) prawns’ from NSW as a BETTER CHOICE.

Prawns are a special occasion food – once reserved for Xmas, Easter and weddings only. We need to be mindful of how often we eat prawns, and where thy come from. Prawn cutlets and cocktails at the pub and most restaurants are like;y t be imported. Ask the question before ordering prawns.

prawns

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Seafood- Trout

26th July, 2015

trout 1

trout

Trout – @AusMarConSoc list ‘sea-cage farmed’ Trout as SAY NO, and ‘land-based farmed’ Trout as THINK TWICE. Salmon and trout farmed in land-based pond systems are a preferable alternative to those produced by sea-cage aquaculture. Pollution of local waters, spread of disease and the quantity of wild-caught fish needed to feed farmed trout are all of concern.

Coral Trout: The stock status of fish species grouped under the name ‘coral trout’ is currently defined as ‘uncertain’ in QLD fisheries reports. QLD fisheries managers have reported declining rates of catch of coral trout, which could indicate problems with stocks of some species. As coral trout are a relatively long-lived group of species, uncertainty in stock status combined with declines in catch rates is of concern

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Snapper

26th July, 2015

Snapper is in fact part of the Bream family and not a ‘True’ Snapper. Snapper is a much sought after species by both commercial and recreational fishers and high fishing pressure in most states have led to stocks being overfished. AVOID.

snapper

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Mahi maui & Mullaway fish

26th July, 2015

fish mullaway

Mahi maui (with the hump) – @AusMarConsSoc lists Mahi Mahi as EAT LESS, predominantly due to concerns about bycatch associated with longline fisheries.

mullaway

Mulloway (Jewfish) – AusMarConSoc lists Wild Mulloway as SAY NO. The NSW Department of Primary Industries classifies wild Mulloway as ‘Overfished’.

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Canned fish

24th July, 2015

which tuna

Look for the MSC stamp. Sustainable-caught brands are Fish 4 Ever, Safcol, or John West ’pole and line caught’. Presently I can’t find a canned fish in Australia that also uses BPA free lining. ‘Wild Planet’ in the states uses some BPA free cans but I can’t find any other.

fish 4 ever

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Barramundi

24th July, 2015

barra

Barramundi is native to Australia, and is both caught in wild fisheries and farmed. Farmed barramundi is mainly produced on land in tanks and ponds (better), with minor volumes produced in the ocean in sea cages. Farming barramundi has a relatively low impact on the natural environment. Farmed Barramundi are usually marketed as ‘Baby’ or ‘Plate sized’, at about 30cm and under 2kg. (Restaurants like consistency in the size.

Barramundi is also imported from Asia, usually filleted and frozen. Definitely avoid this type of Barra’. A similar fish, Nile Perch, is imported from Africa. It cannot be legally sold as Barramundi, though mislabeling can and does occur. Look for wild Barramundi, ideally.

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Seafood Labelling

24th July, 2015

Over 70% of the seafood we eat in Australia is imported. So now we know that it isn’t just the mercury in the big fish that’s a problem, it’s also the amount and type of fish we are eating, plus the amount of bi-catch (see earlier post), the dishonest methods being used to fish such as using GPS to locate schools of fish, sea bed trawling, the sometimes toxic conditions and feed of farmed sea cages and the ever present risk that some will escape into the wild contaminating the wild fish, but now we also have the issue of BPA cans.

In Australia we now have mandatory labelling laws on fresh fish, which means all fresh seafood needs to have its place of origin displayed. Currently the law is not the same for cooked fish, so anything you get from a fish ’n chip shop, restaurant, café, in a box in a supermarket or pub doesn’t require it to be labelled. Hopefully change is not far away though.

As it stands, this type of seafood including prawn cutlets, crumbed and battered fish, fish fingers, crab cakes, seafood sticks (usually not seafood at all actually) you’re getting is more than likely coming from a toxic farm in Thailand or South America.

Buy local fish that has been given the green light, or at least a yellow light from the @AusMarConsSoc Greenpeace International or GoodFishBadFish

fishes
(click image to enlarge)

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